COVID-19

Despite the current difficult circumstances we are finding ourselves in we, as a community, nation and world, find ourselves in it is imperative that we let you know that the gardeners and gardens are continuing to work with our partners both at the local and county levels. We are continuing to provided food and support to all our neighbors in each of our communities.

Aside from the food banks there are numerous other resources available to assist all of us in coping with day to day issues during these trying times. The best ways to access these other resources is through the internet. Among the resources at our local level include: The Leader, the Peninsula Daily News, KPTZ Radio, Local 20/20, Jefferson Healthcare as well as your local school district.

And despite the dark clouds, we have a lot of good news to share. We have had a number of successful work parties recently. They’ve been doing plantings as well as harvesting for the local food banks. We have a new food bank garden. An eighth food bank garden has been added and it is located at Raincoast Farm on Rt. 19 in Port Townsend. We are looking forward to a growing partnership with them in the future. And we are also welcoming a new volunteer coordinator, Rachel Smith! So, yes! There are good things happening despite some of the other news.

So we wish you all the best of health. Take care of yourselves and check on your neighbors (from a safe distance), especially those in susceptible circumstances. These can be the best of times as well as the worst of times. We can make a difference.

In Health.

The Food Bank Farm & Gardens of Jefferson County, WA

Freeze Dryer Pilot Project – Read & Donate Here

Go Fund Me Link

The Food Bank Farm and Gardens of Jefferson County have embarked on a fund raising campaign for two freeze dryers. The plan is to have one available in Port Townsend and the other in Tri-Area. Operators will have had specific training as well as having to have a Washington State Food Handlers License.

The freeze dryer pilot project will help us reduce wasted food.  Hundreds of pounds of fresh produce come into food banks during the three months of peak harvest and not all can be given away before it spoils.
A freeze dryer will allow us to create a supply of food for winter months, when very little fresh produce comes in.  

Freeze drying preserves 96% of the original food value of the fresh food, a much higher percentage than canning or dehydrating. Freeze dried food can last up to 25 years, making it a good choice for a community emergency food supply.

Go Fund Me Link

The dryers are large “Home” dryers, from HarvestRight, with an annual capacity of 2,500 lbs. Given our general distribution this will be more than adequate for a pilot project. In addition, a “commercial” unit would be cost prohibitive. The complete cost of the project is in the range of $12,000.

Your donation will be 100% dedicated to this specific project. We have applied for grant funding through various organizations and have, as of this date, received close to 10% of our goal. Half of this was through a matching grant.

Left = Reconstituted Freeze
Dried
Right = Thawed Frozen
You’d prefer …
FD Vegs for stir frying.
Just add water to reconstitute.
Fresh Bell Peppers
Freeze Dried Bell Peppers

Go Fund Me Link

Harvest Dinner Fundraiser

Dearest Community,
Please join The Community Wellness Project at the annual Harvest Dinner on Thursday, October 24th, in support of garden education, local farm-to-cafeteria and public school nutrition efforts! Hosted at Finnriver by the Community Wellness Project. Tickets can be purchased at jccwp.org

Your tickets and contributions go to supporting school garden outdoor classrooms, community connected learning opportunities and healthy farm-to-cafeteria menu options for both the Chimacum and Port Townsend School Districts.

Creating a foundation of healthy eating in school children supports academic progress and all around well-being.

Hands-on activities in the school gardens gives students a direct connection with the food they eat and not only will improve wellness but also plants the seed of stewardship of the natural world around us.
Please help share the word of our little fundraiser and post to your events calendar!

Sincerely,

Shayna Wiseman, Community Wellness Program

Quimper Grange – March 2020 Update

Winter/Spring 2020
Careful planning provided fresh produce throughout the winter with a twice weekly harvest that included beets, garlic greens, kale, collards, carrots, lettuce and herbs. Jo, Barbara, and Kathy were the principle winter harvesters.
Herb and Kathy consulted with Doug V on the raspberry patch, and then thinned and doubled the length of the row with assistance from Sam, newly returned from international volunteer work. Stephen built a beautiful new trellis with an innovative design to train the vines into a ‘V’ shape and make  the summer harvest easier on Herb!
Jo and Thomas built a new front porch at the shed, expanding the footprint enough to get the lawnmower in and out with greater safety and ease. Thomas also rebuilt many of the raised beds which had decomposed.
Welcome to new volunteer Karen, who will be giving Emily a much needed hand with starting seeds. Also new to the garden are xxxxxx??? Doing ???
Alea continues to improve the worm bins that she designed and built. The worms did their jobs during the coldest months, allowing “black gold” to be harvested recently. Also, the compost bins so well tended in the summer and fall by Martha, produced many cubic feet of beautiful amendment.
The weeding trio of Beth, xx and xxare back in full swing, keeping noxious weeds at bay and the beds healthy and attractive.
Jo and Barbara just installed new row markers, just in time to sew the seeds of this season’s crops. 
As some vegetables are on their final harvests, others that overwintered are just coming into their own. Just yesterday we saw the first small heads of purple broccoli forming. The chard is beginning to perk up. And the next batch of carrots are nearly ready to harvest again.
Extra precautions have been taken by harvest volunteers. The Grange has offered their kitchen as a hygenic place for thorough handwashing and clean handling of the produce. Vegetables are being bundled into serving sizes so that food bank volunteers can easily pack the boxes for curbside pickups.
Volunteers are always needed at this garden. Principle needs currently include more raised bed construction, sanitizing equipment, and mulching, mulching, mulching! We are still able to be outside our homes as long as we keep our 6 foot distance from each other and follow all the prescribed precautions. Let this be a time of compassion.
Etc.

COVID-19

Despite the current difficult circumstances we are finding ourselves in we, as a community, nation and world, find ourselves in it is imperative that we let you know that the gardeners and gardens are continuing to work with our partners both at the local and county levels. We are continuing to provided food and support to all our neighbors in each of our communities.

Aside from the food banks there are numerous other resources available to assist all of us in coping with day to day issues during these trying times. The best ways to access these other resources is through the internet. Among the resources at our local level include: The Leader, the Peninsula Daily News, KPTZ Radio, Local 20/20, Jefferson Healthcare as well as your local school district.

And despite the dark clouds, we have a lot of good news to share. We have had a number of successful work parties recently. They’ve been doing plantings as well as harvesting for the local food banks. We have a new food bank garden. An eighth food bank garden has been added and it is located at Raincoast Farm on Rt. 19 in Port Townsend. We are looking forward to a growing partnership with them in the future. And we are also welcoming a new volunteer coordinator, Rachel Smith! So, yes! There are good things happening despite some of the other news.

So we wish you all the best of health. Take care of yourselves and check on your neighbors (from a safe distance), especially those in susceptible circumstances. These can be the best of times as well as the worst of times. We can make a difference.

In Health.

The Food Bank Farm & Gardens of Jefferson County, WA

CONGRATULATIONS TO US!

What follows is a letter we received in our email today October 17th!

Congratulations! For the 2019 year we decided to grant the $1070 in funds to the Food Bank Farm and Garden Program based on their alignment with our values and their clearly defined need of funds for two upcoming projects. Our plan is to split these funds to help both projects, one project is to purchase a freeze dryer to save excess fall harvest through the winter and the other is for developing the food bank garden in Chimacum. Both projects help create resiliency and food access in our communities and we THANK YOU for your efforts.

This is our second year and we are happy to be able to provide the community with extra funds to support food resiliency.  We knew this wouldn’t be an easy decision and it most definitely wasn’t.  There were ten applicants this year, a number we hope to grow in the next few years. All applicants fit into our four pillars of community sharing, and all had an honorable mission to achieve.

Our process was as follows.  In early October, a team of five gathered to discuss how we would rate the applicants based on a decision matrix with the following categories – project feasibility, operational need, community need, quality of application, track record, and uniqueness. This year was exceptionally hard as all application had great projects they were working on. 

 Warm Regards,

 Andrea Stafford

Food Co-op Marketing Manager

414 Kearney St., Port Townsend, WA 98368